History

Dr. Edwin Donaldson, WSU hard red winter wheat breeder at the Lind Dryland Research Station from 1973 – 1999

The Dryland Research Station at Lind was established in 1915 to “promote the betterment of dryland farming” in the 8- to 12-inch rainfall zone in eastern Washington. Adams County deeded 320 acres to WSU for this purpose. Research efforts throughout the years have largely centered on wheat. Wheat breeding, variety adaptation, weed and disease control, soil fertility, erosion control, and residue management are the main research priorities. The Washington Wheat Commission has been a major contributor to facility development at the Dryland Research Station. One thousand acres of additional land was transferred to the Dryland Research Station by the Washington State Legislature in 1997.

In early years, the Dryland Research Station received adequate public support for personnel, equipment, station improvements, and maintenance. Public support has declined dramatically during the past twenty years. The future of farming in dry areas of eastern Washington depends on a dynamic program of continuing research. Private donations are needed to ensure a permanent annual income to enhance research at the Dryland Research Station. Endowment funds are not used as replacement funds for costs covered by state appropriations.