History Facts

1910’s

1915

  • Beginning of the Lind Dryland Experiment Station

1916

  • First Field Day

1920’s

1920

  • M.A. McCall, Superintendent

1924

  • H.M. Wanser began as assistant to the superintendent

1930’s

1935

  • C.I. Seely, acting superintendent continued through April of 1936

1936

  • A.M. Schlehuber was acting superintendent from June to August

1937

  • Harley D. Jacquot, Superintendent
  • Grain elevator was built

1940’s

1948

  • John J. Sturm, Superintendent from Montana

1949

  • Fire on February 10 destroyed the office building. The Washington State Legislature was in session and they appropriated $46,000 to construct a new office with an attached greenhouse.
  • Adams County Commissioners deeded 2 acres to WSU at the Lind Dryland Research Station.

1950’s

1950

  • Walter L. Nelson, Superintendent

1952

  • February of 1952 Dick ‘Masami’ Nagamitsu began working at the Lind Dryland Research Station.
  • A cross of Burt and Itana and originated (born) in the greenhouse during the winter of 1952-1953. Selections from this cross are now known as Wanser and McCall. In the fall of 1955 the station grew about 10,000 plants. That winter was a winter dreaded by the growers and only 500 of those plants survived. In 1957-1958 the crosses were selected for baking quality. The crosses were turned over to the Washington Crop Improvement Association for distribution to the farmers to produce seed wheat in 1966.

1960’s

1960

  • A 40 x 80 metal shop building was built and was funded by WSU.

1961

  • Gaines, a soft white winter wheat was released. The following year there were 500,000 bushels released for fall production. Attendance at the Lind field tour skyrocketed with interest and around 800 people in attendance.

1964

  • A second greenhouse addition was built, financed by a $12,000 grant from the Washington State Wheat Commission.

1965

  • Two new varieties of hard red winter wheat were developed over the past years at the Lind Dryland Experiment Station. Burt x Itana 34 (Wanser) and Burt x Itana 125 (McCall) were released.
  • The Lind Dryland Research Station celebrated it’s golden anniversary by offering these two new varieites (Wanser and McCall) of wheat showing great promise. These were the first ever developed at Lind for the low rainfall area.
  • In addition Itana 65, Moro, and Nugaines were released.
  • Adams County Commissioners deeded 318 more acres to WSU for the Lind Dryland Research Station.

1966

  • A new deep well was built.
  • The Lind Dryland Research Station was presented an award from the United States Weather Bureau praising the personnel at the station for keeping very complete climatological records since 1916.

1967

  • A new irrigation system was installed. A trailer house was added to the station. Washington Wheat Commission funded $11,000 and the remainder was funded by the state.

1970’s

1970

  • Dr. Vogel speaks at 54th Lind Field Day about semi-dwarf varities that mark breakthrough in the fight against disease, stripe rust and snow mold.

1971

  • Sprague wheat was released. It is a new snow-mold resistant semi-dwarf soft-white winter wheat.
  • Walter Nelson resigned in October.

1972

  • The Lind Dryland Experiment Station became part of the WSU Agronomy and Soils.

1973

  • Sprague, a new soft white winter wheat snow-mold resistant variety, was available to the the commercial market. It was released in 1971.
  • Dr. Edwin Donaldson takes over the hard red winter wheat breeding program at Lind.

1979

  • Hatton, a new hard red winter wheat variety was released

1980’s

1983

  • A seed processing and storage building was completed (now known as the Deffenbaugh building). Total cost was $146,000. The Washington Wheat Commission funded $80,000 and WSU Department of Agriculture (hay and grain fund) contributed $66,000.

1985

  • A machine storage building was built for $65,000 and funded by Washington Wheat Commission.
  • Bruce Sauer joined Lind as a research technician in the hard red winter wheat breeding program.
  • Batum, another new hard red winter wheat variety was released.

1987

  • Andrews, a semi-dwarf hard red winter wheat was released to the growers and in 1991 was registered with Crop Science Society.

1990’s

1990

  • Dick Nagamitsu retired after 38 years as a research technician at Lind. He began working at the station when the wheat breeding program was just beginning and spent his entire career with WSU developing hard red winter wheat varieties.

1995

  • William F. Schillinger, director

1996

  • The Lind Dryland Research Station Endowment was established.

1997

  • Finley, a hard red winter wheat was released.

1998

  • The Mel and Donna Camp Endowment was established.

2000’s

2000

  • Edwin, a soft white winter wheat club was developed over the past few years by the Agricultural Research Center of Washington State University and released in 2000.
  • Otto and Doris Amen established the Otto and Doris Amen Endowment.

2001

  • On April 1 Brian Fode joined the Lind Dryland Research Station as the stations maintenance utility worker.

2004

  • Masami (Named after Dick Nagamitsu), a soft white winter wheat, was developed over the past few years by the Agricultural Research Center of Washington State University and released in 2004.

2005

  • MDM, a semi-dwarf hard white winter wheat variety was developed over the past few years by the Agricultural Research Center of Washington State University and released in 2005.

2006

  • Harry Schafer retires after 11+ years with WSU as a research technician.
  • Tim Smith hired as a research technician III in support of Bill Schillinger’s research program.

2007

  • Xerpha, a soft white winter wheat variety was developed over the past few years by the Agricultural Research Center of Washington State University and released in 2007.
  • Bauermeister, a hard red winter wheat variety was developed over the past few years by the Agricultural Research Center of Washington State University and released in 2007.

2008

  • Gladys Nagamitsu retired after 52+ years of service at the Lind Dryland Research Station.
  • The Edward and Arlene Heinemann Lind Dryland Research Endowment was established.

2010’s

2011

  • John Jacoben hired as a research technician III in support of Bill Schillinger’s research program.
  • Arron Carter released “Otto”, a winter wheat variety named after Otto Amen, long-time Washington legislator and wheat farmer.

2013

  • Office receives a complete remodel with a new roof, new windows, new carpet and linoleum, and new bathroom and laboratory fixtures.

2014

  • Cindy Warriner retired after 17 years of service
  • Samantha Crow hired as office assistant III at the Lind Dryland Research Station

2015

  • Celebrated the 100-year anniversary of the Lind Station during the Lind Field Day on June 11

2016

  • Lind Station was awarded the Honored Institution Award from the United States Department of Commerce in recognition of 100 years of Weather Observations in cooperation with the National Weather Service.